Natural Hair vs. Weaves: It’s Time to End this Battle
Last week, The Root published an article criticizing a meme that made fun of black women who wear weaves.

Writer Jenée Desmond-Harris pointed out that this meme makes various assumptions about black women’s feels about their hair.
Contrary to what I expected, when I scrolled through the comments, tons of people agreed with the meme. Many of them argued that all black women who do not wear their hair in a natural style are struggling with low self-esteem, internalized racism, and self-hate.
In order to pull some folks out of this shallow, misguided thinking, I immediately felt the need to write this post. Let a buzzed-cut girl (who’s been natural her whole life) break it down—because it’s been passed time to end this hair feud.
In defense of weaves and wigs:
Now I won’t sit here and act like internalized racism isn’t an issue in our community. Some people have been taught (at very young ages) that nappy hair is ugly and unkempt. Sometimes weaves, relaxers and other hair trends are an expression of the internalized black hate that has been in our world for centuries.
However, not every girl with a weave has internalized racist views about their hair.
Wearing a weave doesn’t automatically mean you have low self-esteem or self-hate just like wearing natural hair doesn’t automatically mean you’re confident. Michelle Obama wears a weave. So does Janet Mock, Oprah, Shonda Rhimes, Kerry Washington, Beverly Bond (Creator of Black Girls Rock), and many other powerful women. These women have to have a certain level of confidence in order to make it as far as they have.
Oftentimes women wear weaves for protective styling and convenience. Sometimes it’s easier to throw on a cute wig or wear a weave rather than raking through your hair and styling it all the time. Natural styles, including locs, can take quite a bit of time and effort to maintain.
In defense of Naturalistas: 
Being natural isn’t always easy. It takes a lot of courage to be natural in a society that has an all-around hate for natural hair.
Natural girls get very little love in the mainstream, as very few of our major pop stars wear their hair natural when they’re in the spotlight. You hardly find natural hair in Hollywood, fashion, or even the White House (Wouldn’t it be cool to see FLOTUS rockin some double-strand twists). Natural hair is still pretty revolutionary, because unfortunately, our world still has an obsession with European standards of beauty. And unfortunately, our naturalistas are penalized and attacked for wearing their natural hair in various situations. Locs and afros are often viewed as unprofessional in a work environment, several private schools have banned little black girls from wearing afro puffs, and black women in the military have recently faced stricter regulations on certain natural styles.
Yet, natural hair has become on-trend lately. Tons of women are having the Big Chop, there beauty bloggers, tons of Pintrest, Tumblr, and Instagram accounts dedicated to natural hair.
Yes, we do need to teach that black hair is beautiful when it’s in its natural state, but we don’t need to shame others for straighter styles.
There are benefits and drawbacks to both natural hair, weaves, and relaxed hair. People do what works best for them.
At the end of the day, who died and made anybody the hair police? Browsing the internet, you’ll find memes making fun of natural girls and shaming girls with weaves. So whether you wear a weave or your own hair, small-minded people will talk shit either way. If you have a problem with anyone’s hair type or texture, this is all I have to say to you:
Mind ya business, that’s all. Just mind ya business. If it ain’t growing out of your scalp then you have no need to comment or feel any type of way about it.
Read more on black hair at A Womyn’s Worth.

Natural Hair vs. Weaves: It’s Time to End this Battle

Last week, The Root published an article criticizing a meme that made fun of black women who wear weaves.

Weave V. Natural

Writer Jenée Desmond-Harris pointed out that this meme makes various assumptions about black women’s feels about their hair.

Contrary to what I expected, when I scrolled through the comments, tons of people agreed with the meme. Many of them argued that all black women who do not wear their hair in a natural style are struggling with low self-esteem, internalized racism, and self-hate.

In order to pull some folks out of this shallow, misguided thinking, I immediately felt the need to write this post. Let a buzzed-cut girl (who’s been natural her whole life) break it down—because it’s been passed time to end this hair feud.

In defense of weaves and wigs:

Now I won’t sit here and act like internalized racism isn’t an issue in our community. Some people have been taught (at very young ages) that nappy hair is ugly and unkempt. Sometimes weaves, relaxers and other hair trends are an expression of the internalized black hate that has been in our world for centuries.

However, not every girl with a weave has internalized racist views about their hair.

Wearing a weave doesn’t automatically mean you have low self-esteem or self-hate just like wearing natural hair doesn’t automatically mean you’re confident. Michelle Obama wears a weave. So does Janet Mock, Oprah, Shonda Rhimes, Kerry Washington, Beverly Bond (Creator of Black Girls Rock), and many other powerful women. These women have to have a certain level of confidence in order to make it as far as they have.

Oftentimes women wear weaves for protective styling and convenience. Sometimes it’s easier to throw on a cute wig or wear a weave rather than raking through your hair and styling it all the time. Natural styles, including locs, can take quite a bit of time and effort to maintain.

In defense of Naturalistas:

Being natural isn’t always easy. It takes a lot of courage to be natural in a society that has an all-around hate for natural hair.

Natural girls get very little love in the mainstream, as very few of our major pop stars wear their hair natural when they’re in the spotlight. You hardly find natural hair in Hollywood, fashion, or even the White House (Wouldn’t it be cool to see FLOTUS rockin some double-strand twists). Natural hair is still pretty revolutionary, because unfortunately, our world still has an obsession with European standards of beauty. And unfortunately, our naturalistas are penalized and attacked for wearing their natural hair in various situations. Locs and afros are often viewed as unprofessional in a work environment, several private schools have banned little black girls from wearing afro puffs, and black women in the military have recently faced stricter regulations on certain natural styles.

NAT hairYet, natural hair has become on-trend lately. Tons of women are having the Big Chop, there beauty bloggers, tons of Pintrest, Tumblr, and Instagram accounts dedicated to natural hair.

Yes, we do need to teach that black hair is beautiful when it’s in its natural state, but we don’t need to shame others for straighter styles.

There are benefits and drawbacks to both natural hair, weaves, and relaxed hair. People do what works best for them.

At the end of the day, who died and made anybody the hair police? Browsing the internet, you’ll find memes making fun of natural girls and shaming girls with weaves. So whether you wear a weave or your own hair, small-minded people will talk shit either way. If you have a problem with anyone’s hair type or texture, this is all I have to say to you:

Mind ya businessMind ya business, that’s all. Just mind ya business. If it ain’t growing out of your scalp then you have no need to comment or feel any type of way about it.

Read more on black hair at A Womyn’s Worth.

Quote of the Week



Toni Morrison’s Beloved, which takes place in both pre and post-civil war eras, is so relevant today. Hollywood defines women and people of color in typecast roles and saves the world-saving, leading, and positive roles for a white-washed cast. What does that say about us? How does that define people of color?

Read more about boycotting Hollywood, Typecasting, and Whitewashing at awomynsworth.com.
Quote of the Week
Toni Morrison’s Beloved, which takes place in both pre and post-civil war eras, is so relevant today. Hollywood defines women and people of color in typecast roles and saves the world-saving, leading, and positive roles for a white-washed cast. What does that say about us? How does that define people of color?
Read more about boycotting Hollywood, Typecasting, and Whitewashing at awomynsworth.com.
I’m not a “movie person,” but summer always brings a few films I’m excited to see. However, after writing my recent article about Hollywood’s addiction to typecasting, I couldn’t walk into a theater without feeling guilty. Every time I purchased a ticket, my black feminist conscience would yell, “Are you really going to support an industry that doesn’t give a shit about you?”
I ignored her at first, but after the disappointments from the latest movies I’ve seen, X-men: Days of Future Past, Think Like a Man 2, and Godzilla—I’m officially done with Hollywood.
I’ll save my movie money for an industry that isn’t going to regurgitate stereotypes wrapped in lame, white-washed plots.
I have 3 reasons:
1. Hollywood doesn’t know what to do with women.
As a fan of all things alien and futuristic, Transformers is usually right up my alley. But third Transformers, released prior to the latest movie turned me off for good.
The majority of the time, the lead actress screams and runs from Decepticons in high heels. I’m watching the movie yelling “Bitch, if you don’t take off those heels and run like you got some sense.”
And can she do anything else besides scream, run, and act as the distraction while Shia LaBeouf saves the day?
So I refused to see the latest Transformers because I knew it would have all the same hackneyed motifs— and according to a few reviews, I was spot on.
I mean, is anyone else tired of the Damsel in Distress in action films?
Some of these writers need to take note from The Hunger Games series.
Transformers isn’t the only movie that could’ve utilized the female characters better. In X-men: Days of Future Past, the good white men save the day while the women and characters of colors sit and wait. However, in a 90’s cartoon version of Days of Future Past, it is actually Kitty Pryde who goes back in time to save mutants and humans from their horrible future. Xmen with a woman saving the day sounds like a cools concept. Especially considering Pryde’s mutation makes her untouchable, literally.
I love Hugh Jackman as Wolverine—but it’s time for a diverse range of characters to take the spotlight.
2. White = Universal
Where are all my black leading characters? Not in action films. Not in sci-fi. Not even in animated films. Oh that’s right: black characters are ghettoized into the black film genre, which currently includes the Think Like a Man series, Tyler Perry films (ugh), and whatever Kevin Hart’s currently starring in.
As for all the other people of color: Y’all don’t even get “race-themed” genres.
Yet, whenever all of the characters in a film are white, directors love to claim that “it’s not about race.” Films like Noah and the Gods of Egypt got a lot of pushback for their majority-white cast.
When asked about the lack of diversity in Noah, Co-writer Handel gives one of worst responses: “What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people.”
And there lies the problem: white is the “stand-in for all people.” Only white skin can represent the whole of our society. This thinking is the very reason why movies are so white, why you hardly ever see Asian male characters in films outside of martial arts films (and Godzilla), and why Halle Berry is the only woman of color ever to receive an Oscar for Best Actress for a leading role.
Let’s get one thing straight: whenever a cast of characters is mostly white, it’s not an accident. If race really didn’t matter, then we would see more diversity. We live in an extremely diverse country with people of origins all over the globe. You just won’t find them on the screen.
READ MORE at awomynsworth.com

I’m not a “movie person,” but summer always brings a few films I’m excited to see. However, after writing my recent article about Hollywood’s addiction to typecasting, I couldn’t walk into a theater without feeling guilty. Every time I purchased a ticket, my black feminist conscience would yell, “Are you really going to support an industry that doesn’t give a shit about you?”

I ignored her at first, but after the disappointments from the latest movies I’ve seen, X-men: Days of Future Past, Think Like a Man 2, and Godzilla—I’m officially done with Hollywood.

I’ll save my movie money for an industry that isn’t going to regurgitate stereotypes wrapped in lame, white-washed plots.

I have 3 reasons:

1. Hollywood doesn’t know what to do with women.

As a fan of all things alien and futuristic, Transformers is usually right up my alley. But third Transformers, released prior to the latest movie turned me off for good.

The majority of the time, the lead actress screams and runs from Decepticons in high heels. I’m watching the movie yelling “Bitch, if you don’t take off those heels and run like you got some sense.”

And can she do anything else besides scream, run, and act as the distraction while Shia LaBeouf saves the day?

So I refused to see the latest Transformers because I knew it would have all the same hackneyed motifs— and according to a few reviews, I was spot on.

I mean, is anyone else tired of the Damsel in Distress in action films?

Some of these writers need to take note from The Hunger Games series.

Transformers isn’t the only movie that could’ve utilized the female characters better. In X-men: Days of Future Past, the good white men save the day while the women and characters of colors sit and wait. However, in a 90’s cartoon version of Days of Future Past, it is actually Kitty Pryde who goes back in time to save mutants and humans from their horrible future. Xmen with a woman saving the day sounds like a cools concept. Especially considering Pryde’s mutation makes her untouchable, literally.

I love Hugh Jackman as Wolverine—but it’s time for a diverse range of characters to take the spotlight.

2. White = Universal

Where are all my black leading characters? Not in action films. Not in sci-fi. Not even in animated films. Oh that’s right: black characters are ghettoized into the black film genre, which currently includes the Think Like a Man series, Tyler Perry films (ugh), and whatever Kevin Hart’s currently starring in.

As for all the other people of color: Y’all don’t even get “race-themed” genres.

Yet, whenever all of the characters in a film are white, directors love to claim that “it’s not about race.” Films like Noah and the Gods of Egypt got a lot of pushback for their majority-white cast.

When asked about the lack of diversity in Noah, Co-writer Handel gives one of worst responses: “What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people.”

And there lies the problem: white is the “stand-in for all people.” Only white skin can represent the whole of our society. This thinking is the very reason why movies are so white, why you hardly ever see Asian male characters in films outside of martial arts films (and Godzilla), and why Halle Berry is the only woman of color ever to receive an Oscar for Best Actress for a leading role.

Let’s get one thing straight: whenever a cast of characters is mostly white, it’s not an accident. If race really didn’t matter, then we would see more diversity. We live in an extremely diverse country with people of origins all over the globe. You just won’t find them on the screen.

READ MORE at awomynsworth.com

Makeup 101: Orange is the New Red (Lipstick)

As I’ve been transitioning into this whole “grown woman”  thing, or whatever you want to call it, I’ve been playing with a little bit of makeup. I still consider myself a Makeup Minimalist, but I’ll throw on some mascara every now and then–and you know I have a thing for blue lipstick.
Lately though I’ve been feeling orange lips–maybe because it’s the perfect color to begin the summer.
I have 2 orange colors I’m working with now.
A Cheap, off-brand MAC that I found while shopping downtown. It doesn’t even have a name, but it does the trick.
Another cheapy product that I saw in the beauty supply called Ruby Kisses “Shiny Orange.” I  was instantly drawn to the color.  So I paid the $2 (right after I checked a few online reviews), took it home, tried it on and instantly fell in love.
I put both colors on top of a brown lip liner (Otherwise I’d walk out the house looking like I dyed my lips with Kool Aid. That brown lip liner is a life saver).
Anyways, since summer is here I figured I’d give you all a few summer style post. Check out the Stylish Statements section of A Womyn’s Worth for more.
Oh, and follow me on Instagram: I’m Androshae

Makeup 101: Orange is the New Red (Lipstick)

As I’ve been transitioning into this whole “grown woman”  thing, or whatever you want to call it, I’ve been playing with a little bit of makeup. I still consider myself a Makeup Minimalist, but I’ll throw on some mascara every now and then–and you know I have a thing for blue lipstick.

Lately though I’ve been feeling orange lips–maybe because it’s the perfect color to begin the summer.

I have 2 orange colors I’m working with now.

  • A Cheap, off-brand MAC that I found while shopping downtown. It doesn’t even have a name, but it does the trick.
  • Another cheapy product that I saw in the beauty supply called Ruby Kisses “Shiny Orange.” I  was instantly drawn to the color.  So I paid the $2 (right after I checked a few online reviews), took it home, tried it on and instantly fell in love.

I put both colors on top of a brown lip liner (Otherwise I’d walk out the house looking like I dyed my lips with Kool Aid. That brown lip liner is a life saver).

Anyways, since summer is here I figured I’d give you all a few summer style post. Check out the Stylish Statements section of A Womyn’s Worth for more.

Oh, and follow me on Instagram: I’m Androshae

niggaimdeadass
whitegirlsaintshit:

janekrahe:

sarahreesbrennan:

geek-ramblings:

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett [Johansson] does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that. There’s so many of these little people out here doing awful things for money in the world of being famous. And little girls see that. They should have the opposite spectrum of that to look up to.

Dreamboat, check, awesome human being, check. 

#look at your favorites#now back to mackie#sadly your favorites aren’t mackie#but if they stopped being misogynistic assholes#they could be like mackie#look back at this post#this post is now that piece of furniture you’ve always wanted#and he found it in a dumpster#he doesn’t need a horse because he flies on the sighs of angels

make her black. make her me. make me wonderwoman. give me a few months to train and i’ll be her. give me the job.

whitegirlsaintshit:

janekrahe:

sarahreesbrennan:

geek-ramblings:

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett [Johansson] does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that. There’s so many of these little people out here doing awful things for money in the world of being famous. And little girls see that. They should have the opposite spectrum of that to look up to.

Dreamboat, check, awesome human being, check. 

make her black. make her me. make me wonderwoman. give me a few months to train and i’ll be her. give me the job.

The other day, some self-righteous troll commented on my blog saying that wearing my short shorts is prideful. He/she went on to tell me that I should stop showing off my body, and instead focus on serving my brothers and sisters. He/she also blamed me for “the sins of my brothers and sisters.”
My apologies y’all—I didn’t realize my outfit was powerful enough lead good men and women away from their faith.
Lucky for me, the person promised to pray for me so that I will be rescued from my evil, shorts-wearing ways.
Since all of my readers aren’t fortunate enough to have oh-so-thoughtful internet-commenters praying for them, I figured I should help y’all out.
In order to save the rest of my sexy sisters from degradation, I’ve created this handy list for black women to use in order to navigate through life in a way that is respectable in our society.*
If someone is having “impure” thoughts because your body is curvy, it’s completely your fault. People are not responsible for their own actions—it’s all on you. Keep that in mind when you get dressed every morning.
Yes, you might have been created curvy, but you were meant to cover up those curves.
Stop twerking already! It’s only considered an art form when white women do it—when you twerk, it’s just plain vulgar.
Any love of your body is prideful and needs to stop immediately. Your job is to focus on loving and serving everyone else—but definitely not yourself.
Showing off does not mean you love your body—it means you have low self-esteem. It means you are looking for attention. So if a guy approaches you in a rude or aggressive manner, you only have yourself to blame.
Don’t you dare breastfeed in public. Especially not when your baby is wailing with hunger—that’s just plain rude. Go to the foul smelling public restroom. That is what restrooms are for; that is the only place suitable to feed an infant.
Rihanna, Beyonce, Nicki Minaj, and all other black popstars are the scum of the earth. There is nothing we can learn from the Queens of THOTs. They’re indiscretions and claiming that their bodies are their own is not to be mimicked.
You can’t be smart and sexy. No, women aren’t that complex. Either you’re a THOT, or you aren’t—but you probably are.
No matter how many of you are out there graduating with advanced degrees, working hard to provide for your families, and/or being successful in whatever you put your mind to, as a whole, you will always be ratchet bitches that aint shit (but hoes and tricks). Know your place.
*Psst, This is satire. However, some of these are quotes from what ignorant people have commented my “I Wear Short Shorts Because I’m a Feminist”

The other day, some self-righteous troll commented on my blog saying that wearing my short shorts is prideful. He/she went on to tell me that I should stop showing off my body, and instead focus on serving my brothers and sisters. He/she also blamed me for “the sins of my brothers and sisters.”

My apologies y’all—I didn’t realize my outfit was powerful enough lead good men and women away from their faith.

Lucky for me, the person promised to pray for me so that I will be rescued from my evil, shorts-wearing ways.

Since all of my readers aren’t fortunate enough to have oh-so-thoughtful internet-commenters praying for them, I figured I should help y’all out.

In order to save the rest of my sexy sisters from degradation, I’ve created this handy list for black women to use in order to navigate through life in a way that is respectable in our society.*

  1. If someone is having “impure” thoughts because your body is curvy, it’s completely your fault. People are not responsible for their own actions—it’s all on you. Keep that in mind when you get dressed every morning.
  1. Yes, you might have been created curvy, but you were meant to cover up those curves.
  1. Stop twerking already! It’s only considered an art form when white women do it—when you twerk, it’s just plain vulgar.
  1. Any love of your body is prideful and needs to stop immediately. Your job is to focus on loving and serving everyone else—but definitely not yourself.
  1. Showing off does not mean you love your body—it means you have low self-esteem. It means you are looking for attention. So if a guy approaches you in a rude or aggressive manner, you only have yourself to blame.
  1. Don’t you dare breastfeed in public. Especially not when your baby is wailing with hunger—that’s just plain rude. Go to the foul smelling public restroom. That is what restrooms are for; that is the only place suitable to feed an infant.
  1. Rihanna, Beyonce, Nicki Minaj, and all other black popstars are the scum of the earth. There is nothing we can learn from the Queens of THOTs. They’re indiscretions and claiming that their bodies are their own is not to be mimicked.
  1. You can’t be smart and sexy. No, women aren’t that complex. Either you’re a THOT, or you aren’t—but you probably are.
  1. No matter how many of you are out there graduating with advanced degrees, working hard to provide for your families, and/or being successful in whatever you put your mind to, as a whole, you will always be ratchet bitches that aint shit (but hoes and tricks). Know your place.

*Psst, This is satire. However, some of these are quotes from what ignorant people have commented my “I Wear Short Shorts Because I’m a Feminist